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CliC News

Here's what has been happening lately in CliC. Let us know if you have things to share.

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Johansson, Kang and Pavlova to Join CliC SSG

Margareta JohanssonWe are pleased to announce that the Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) for the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) has appointed Margareta Johannsson (Sweden), Shichang Kang (China), and Tatiana Pavlova (Russia) as new members of the CliC Scientific Steering Group (SSG) beginning in January 2015.

Dr. Margareta Johansson is based at the Dept of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science at Lund University and at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Sweden. Dr. Johansson has a broad experience in Arctic research, ranging from glaciology/climatology to Arctic ecology and for the last eight years focussing on permafrost in a changing climate in northern Sweden. Her research experience includes helping to coordinate major environmental assessments such as a chapter in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) on terrestrial ecosystems, and international networks such as “A circumarctic network of Terrestrial Field Bases" (SCANNET). She is currently the Executive Secretary for a FP7 EU project INTERACT networking more than 60 research stations in the north and for a nordic top-level research initiative DEFROST and was a co-coordinator of the Permafrost Young Researchers Network (PYRN) during 2006-2008 when it was initiated. Dr. Johansson was one of two convening lead authors for two chapters (snow and permafrost) of the SWIPA assessment (Snow Water Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic) that is a follow up on the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment but are focussing on the cryosphere. The SWIPA report was published in December 2011.

Shichang KangDr. Shichang Kang is a Professor and Director of the State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Dr. Kang has been awarded the "Talent Project" of CAS and National Science Foundation of China for Distinguished Young Scholars. He has been a PI or co-PIs for more than 40 projects, and has organized more than 30 expeditions in the Tibetan Plateau including several 7000+ meter expeditions. He has supervised more than 20 PhD and Master students. Dr. Kang is the associate editor of Atmospheric Research, and a member of Education and Capacity Building of IUGG. Dr. Kang mainly focuses on glacier and climate changes, environmental chemistry of snow/ice and atmosphere, and paleo-climate and environmental variability recovered by ice core records in the Tibetan Plateau. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, with more than 150 papers published in international journals.

Dr. Tatiana Pavlova is a lead scientist at the Laboratory for Atmospheric General Circulation and Global Climate Modelling, Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory (MGO) in St. Petersburg, Russia. She received M.Sc in meteorology from the Leningrad Tatiana PavlovaHydrometeorological Institute and Ph.D. (also in meteorology) from MGO. Tatiana’s research interests include climate modeling, climate change and variability in extratropics, cryospheric processes. She is an expert in terrestrial processes modeling (including permafrost). Tatiana was a contributing author to IPCC WGI AR4 (2007) and IPCC WG1 AR5 (2013), an author and lead author of Russian national first (2008) and second (2014) climate assessments. She is a member of WG27 PICES: “North Pacific Climate variability and Change” (PICES- The North Pacific Marine Science Organization) and a member of the Russian National Committee for CliC.

Please join us in welcoming Margareta, Shichang and Tatiana to the CliC SSG.

Permafrost Carbon Network: Late summer Update 2014

1

- The Permafrost Carbon Network is a CliC sponsored activity

 

71 abstracts was received for the AGU session about the Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change and PCN were allocated three oral time slots and one poster session. The high number of abstract submissions is very satisfactory and they are looking forward to great sessions at AGU.

The first round of funding for the Permafrost Carbon Network is ending and they have finished an exciting number of synthesis activities. The Permafrost Carbon Network will be continued and is part of the permafrost action team within SEARCH (http://www.arcus.org/search-program). They will provide more details on structural changes and additional angles to the network at their annual meeting on Sunday prior to AGU.

 

Some recent publications:

Aiken GR, Spencer RGM, Striegl RG, Schuster PF, Raymond PA (2014) Influences of glacier melt and permafrost thaw on the age of dissolved organic carbon in the Yukon River basin. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 28, 2013GB004764.

Deng J, Li C, Frolking S, Zhang Y, Bäckstrand K, Crill P (2014) Assessing effects of permafrost thaw on C fluxes based on multiyear modeling across a permafrost thaw gradient at Stordalen, Sweden. Biogeosciences, 11, 4753-4770.

Olefeldt D, Roulet NT (2014) Permafrost conditions in peatlands regulate magnitude, timing, and chemical composition of catchment dissolved organic carbon export. Global Change Biology, 20, 3122-3136.

Li J, Luo Y, Natali S, Schuur EAG, Xia J, Kowalczyk E, Wang Y (2014) Modeling permafrost thaw and ecosystem carbon cycle under annual and seasonal warming at an Arctic tundra site in Alaska. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 119, 2013JG002569.

Lupascu M, Welker JM, Xu X, Czimczik CI (2014) Rates and radiocarbon content of summer ecosystem respiration in response to long-term deeper snow in the High Arctic of NW Greenland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 119, 2013JG002494.

Walter Anthony KM, Zimov SA, Grosse G et al. (2014b) A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch. Nature, 511, 452-456. 10.1038/nature13560

Workshop Announcement: Large-scale climate variability in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

We are pleased to announce an open call for expressions of interest to participate in a workshop on 'Large-scale climate variability in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean over decades to centuries, and links to extra-polar climate', for which a limited number of places are available. The workshop will be held March 24-26 2015, at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.  It is organized as part of the WCRP Research Program Polar Climate Predictability Initiative in collaboration with PAGES. We have limited support for travel, which we will be reserved to support early career scientists and scientists from developing nations, who are especially encouraged to apply.

The objective of the workshop is to develop an assessment of large-scale patterns of Antarctic climate variability over the last decades to centuries, and the extrapolar-polar teleconnections, by combining proxy records, historical data, modern instrumental records, and model results.  Further information on aims of the meeting can be found in the attached file.

In order to make the workshop as productive as possible, we anticipate holding one or two telecons in the months leading up to the workshop in order to identify key variables that we'll want to examine during the workshop.  A planned outcome of the workshop will be a journal publication presenting our assessment. More information can be found here: http://www.climate-cryosphere.org/wcrp/pcpi/meetings/initiative-1-mar2015.

If you are interested in participating, please send an email before September 15, including information on the four items below, to Hugues Goosse ():

  • Name, and affiliation
  • Your position (in particular if you are an early career scientist, i.e. PhD student or PhD completion less than 5 years ago).
  • Why would you be interested in participating and/or contributing to the workshop (5 lines max).
  • Would you require funding, or would you be able to participate in the workshop without support for the meeting organization?

 
The workshop organizers will review all applications, taking into account the potential contribution of each applicant to the workshop and availability of funds, and they will inform you of the outcome before October 6.

Six priorities for Antarctic science

1Rob Massom and Jenny Baeseman represented the CliC Community through this process

The official outcomes of the 1st SCAR Antarctic and Southern Ocean Science Horizon Scan were published online today as a COMMENT in Nature (512, 23–25; 2014 http://www.nature.com/news/1.15658) entitled “Six priorities for Antarctic science”.

In April 2014, the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) convened 75 scientists and policy-makers from 22 countries to agree on the priorities for Antarctic research for the next two decades and beyond. This is the first time the international Antarctic community has formulated a collective vision through discussions, debate and voting. The Horizon Scan narrowed a list of hundreds of scientific questions to the 80 most pressing ones.

The questions fall broadly into six scientific priorities: 
1) define the global reach of the Antarctic atmosphere and Southern Ocean;
2) understand how, where and why ice sheets lose mass;
3) reveal Antarctica’s history;
4) learn how Antarctic life evolved and Survived;
5) observe space and the Universe; and
6) recognize and mitigate human influences.

Read more...

SOOS Townhall on Southern Ocean Ecosystem Essential Ocean Variables

1- SOOS is a CliC Endorsed Project

SOOS will be running a lunchtime Town Hall meeting alongside the SCAR Open Science Conference to inform all interested of the outcomes from the recent SOOS workshop on Identification of ecosystem Essential Ocean Variables. This Town Hall is open to all interested to participate.
A light lunch will be provided for the first 50 participants on a first-come first-served basis.
For more information, please contact Louise Newman ()

Auckland, New Zealand, 27 August 2014, The Auckland Room 13:30 - 14:30

Call for Abstracts: Permafrost Carbon Network: AGU Fall Meeting Session

1

- The Permafrost Carbon Networl is a Clic sponsored activity

Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change (session ID#: 2294)

Permafrost zone soils contain 1670 Pg of carbon (C). Permafrost degradation can change ecosystem C storage by enhancing microbial activity and ecosystem respiration, but can also stimulate plant growth and increase C stored in vegetation and surface soil. This session invites papers that examine factors causing losses and gains in ecosystem C storage that relate to the question: What is the magnitude, timing and form of C release from permafrost zone ecosystems in a changing climate? Papers may address any aspect of this topic from microbial communities to the global scale, using a range of measurements or modeling to detect and forecast permafrost thaw and the influence on the C cycle and future climate.

Conveners:
Christina Schädel, University of Florida
Dave McGuire, University of Alaska Fairbanks
David Olefeldt, University of Alberta

There are a number of other related permafrost sessions at AGU this year and the conveners hope that you consider to contribute your abstract to the session.

CliC at the 35th Session of the WCRP Joint Science Committee

1The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) had their 35th annual Joint Science Committee meeting from 30 June to 4 July in Heidelberg, Germany. The CliC community was well represented (see photo). The meeting created a relaxed atmosphere where the new WCRP Director David Carlson was introduced to the group and was able to hear about the great things that are happening within CliC and WCRP. The meeting also provided a unique opportunity for several of the CliC leaders to meet with other WCRP activity leads to discuss ways to better collaborate and increase our understanding of the cryosphere’s interactions with climate.

Greg Flato, CliC’s co-chair, and Ted Shepherd (PCPI co-lead) gave great presentations on our activities. The presentations are available at the links below and the summaries follow:

Read more...

Help Define Permafrost Research Priorities

CliC and the International Permafrost Association (IPA) are seeking your input. We invite you to participate in a survey on ‘Permafrost Research Priorities’ (PRP), which aims at identifying the top priorities in permafrost research. The process will span much of 2014 engaging the research community and will result in a short publication listing and putting into context research priorities. The document shall become the benchmark against which permafrost research should be gauged starting in 2015. The final document of priorities will be sent to national and international funding agencies, international organizations, policy makers, and others with interests in supporting permafrost research.  It will form one of the outputs of the International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III).

We are interested in collecting forward-looking research questions (max. 3) from individuals with professional interests in understanding physical, biogeochemical, ecological, and social processes that affect permafrost areas in the Arctic, the Antarctic and in mountain regions.

The following link will guide you to the survey and detailed background information on the PRP process. Deadline for submitting questions is 20 September 2014.

http://permafrostpriorities.org

In Memoriam: Heidi Isaksen

1It is with great sadness that we inform you that our Administrative Officer, Heidi Isaksen passed away on Friday, 11 July, after a very short battle with cancer.

Heidi began working for CliC in June 2012. She enjoyed her job and especially loved working with all of you - either in person or remotely. Heidi was only 44 years young and left behind two wonderful girls, ages 11 and 15. The funeral will be on 22 July at the Arctic Cathedral here in Tromsø.
 
We are putting together a memory book to give to her children with the gift of a tree that they can plant and that will grow with them in the Norwegian nature that Heidi enjoyed so much.

If you have any memories, stories, pictures, kind words, etc. that you would like included, please send them before 26 August to Jenny